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Workings of Shootproof

  • 18 June 2020
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So this is a several part question. And I'm sure it's going to maybe sound like I should know these. But first,  context. I've worked for several photo studios with different models of pricing. I have no problems pricing my fine art prints (drawings, paintings, etc) but I haven't fully developed a pricing plan for my own photo studio sessions. I've done a lot of research but they haven't quite answered my questions. 

1. How does the value versus cost work? The value maybe 40, but I don't just photograph. I edit, crop, and offer requests to a degree (blemishes, etc) after the shoot. I want to price accordingly. In prints, one package I want to offer came out to 30 but there's editing and time, plus my experience so I want taken into account.  So also, are there charges to me if I want to offer metal prints and the package costs 130 but I charge 100?

2. I'll be charging a non-refundable deposit to hold the date and to cover already incurred expenses on my part in case they back out. I've been recommended to do this by several professionals I know because they said it helped their show rate. They had many just never contact them again and used up gas and had covered a business meeting. But, how do I put part or all of that amount towards their package if they do show? Or do those of you with experience suggest I don't and include that in my consultation before the shoot? 

3. I want to offer digital files for some but not all packages. I've already got a print release I'll be including. I saw options to include one. But how do I find a good template for a copyright release if they want to use it for a senior photo for school/or business or something else? Or is there an option for that available?

4. I want to be fair to myself in pricing but I also want my packages to be on the lower end because they won't be shot inside a fixed location and I want to make sure my photography doesn't break the bank. 

If you've read through this whole thing, I thank you. If you've read through and could even answer part, I thank you very much. If you can answer all four, you are a true guru. Because yes photography is a business and others are competition, but I don't want to be a cookie cutter photographer. I love my job I have but I'd like more creative freedom in my downtime.  

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Best answer by KarenClouse 24 June 2020, 15:51

Hi @KrystianaSims! There are so many different business models in photography, but whichever you choose, you must be profitable to stay in business. So, in answer to #1: The cost of your prints and products shouldn’t be just the cost of the paper and ink. It should cover the time you spend communicating with your clients, editing, marketing, education, etc. Also, remember that you’ll need to set aside about 30% of what you make for taxes. If you charge your clients less than the product itself, you’ll pay for the difference, and you won’t be profitable. 

2. Most photographers charge some sort of session fee, and require a deposit up front. You can use ShootProof invoices to charge them before the session. If you’d like to apply that amount (or a portion of it) to post-shoot purchases, you can give them a cart discount. 

3. If you are selling the rights to your art, make sure you research it thoroughly, find a lawyer to write a contract for you, and that you’re charging appropriately. 

4. Check out the ShootProof blog for lots of inspiration as you’re deciding on your pricing and be confident that you deserve a living wage for your work. Google Cost of Doing Business Calculator to find out what you need to charge to make the money you’ll need to in order to stay in business. Here’s a good one: https://newbtog.wixsite.com/probabyholder/single-post/2017/04/07/What-should-I-charge-for-my-photography?fbclid=IwAR2Ky-7g7cDpoTXoLjrnYVTL4NfwMB681mdvyu1P7-F4mQFGYUw1__NsmK4

Wishing you all the best as you’re getting started!

 

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Hi @KrystianaSims! There are so many different business models in photography, but whichever you choose, you must be profitable to stay in business. So, in answer to #1: The cost of your prints and products shouldn’t be just the cost of the paper and ink. It should cover the time you spend communicating with your clients, editing, marketing, education, etc. Also, remember that you’ll need to set aside about 30% of what you make for taxes. If you charge your clients less than the product itself, you’ll pay for the difference, and you won’t be profitable. 

2. Most photographers charge some sort of session fee, and require a deposit up front. You can use ShootProof invoices to charge them before the session. If you’d like to apply that amount (or a portion of it) to post-shoot purchases, you can give them a cart discount. 

3. If you are selling the rights to your art, make sure you research it thoroughly, find a lawyer to write a contract for you, and that you’re charging appropriately. 

4. Check out the ShootProof blog for lots of inspiration as you’re deciding on your pricing and be confident that you deserve a living wage for your work. Google Cost of Doing Business Calculator to find out what you need to charge to make the money you’ll need to in order to stay in business. Here’s a good one: https://newbtog.wixsite.com/probabyholder/single-post/2017/04/07/What-should-I-charge-for-my-photography?fbclid=IwAR2Ky-7g7cDpoTXoLjrnYVTL4NfwMB681mdvyu1P7-F4mQFGYUw1__NsmK4

Wishing you all the best as you’re getting started!

 

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